Pterodactyl Attacks and Human Deaths

I rarely mention jaws that snap or claws that scratch. I write more on featherless features of long-tailed creatures, emphasizing both non-bird and non-bat evidence from eyewitnesses, and  I warn against a weakness in Western mentality, pleading for self-inoculation against the intellectual danger of bulverism. Laying aside those points, I’ve recently read the cryptozoology book Bird From Hell, not the best…

Long-tailed Pterosaur in Spain

Three years ago, I received a long email from an Englishman who had a sighting of a pterosaur in Spain, just a few months earlier. This flying creature may be related to the kongamato of Africa, or at least to some pterosaur-like creatures seen in Africa. . . . I assure you I am NOT LYING-…

Pterosaurs, Evolution, and Extinction

My associates and I, including Garth Guessman and David Woetzel, have no confidence in Darwin’s philosopohy of unlimited evolution. In fact, we actively point out weaknesses in that idea. We do not portray a modern living pterosaur as disproof, by itself, of the General Theory of Evolution (unlimited common ancestry); but I believe that it will become part…

Kongamato and Ropen

The kongamato of Africa has been compared with the ropen of Papua New Guinea, in that similarly-described flying creatures have been associated with grave robbery. But what’s in a name? Apparent pterosaurs have various names in various countries of the world; in the United States, we sometimes hear “pterodactyl” and “dinosaur bird.” Regardless of the…

Pterosaurs or Stingrays in Africa?

Stingrays are related to sharks and some live in fresh water. An apparently fresh conjecture about the origin, in Africa, of the word “Kongamato,” however, has little relevance to most reports of living pterosaurs. The idea that a species of large stingray may have been the origin of the African word for “overturner or boats” may have some…